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First Look: Dyson 360 Heurist robot wants to be the smartest vacuum cleaner ever


Dyson is to home appliances as Apple is to phones and computing – stylish, secretive and attention grabbing. And there’s nothing that piques our interest like the words “Dyson” and "Robot” together.

Enter then the Dyson 360 Heurist – a next-gen attempt at perfecting the robot vacuum cleaner for the home. The follow up to 2016’s Dyson 360 Eye, a bot that had a lot going for it – if not the fully-polished prize we usually get from Dyson – the Heurist looks to answer many of the issues that first model raised.

(Image credit: Future)

Same looks, new smarts

At first glance you’d be forgiven for thinking not much had changed. And, in terms of the Dyson 360 Heurist’s looks, that’d be true. Aside from a new paint job (a more friendlier royal blue and silver this time around), the industrial design is more or less identical. It’s still taller and stouter than most robot competing robot vacuum cleaners, allowing more room for Dyson’s powerful motors to be squeezed in, and still uses tank treads for confidently navigating uneven surfaces around the home.

(Image credit: Future)

Under the hood, however, lots has changed. As the “Heurist” name suggests, it’s a smarter robot than before, capable of a degree of learning and automation beyond its predecessors capabilities. There’s a quad-core processor on board running 450,000 lines of code, with 10GB of memory – a 20x increase over Dyson’s first robot. With this added processing power, the robot is able to store a map of your home onboard, refining its accuracy with every clean for improved navigation.

Eight sensors also play into that improved navigation system, with the 360 “Eye” camera that sits on top of the robot now also sporting a light for situations where lighting conditions may be low. Simultaneous Localisation and Mapping (SLAM) technology makes the robot scan the room every 20 milliseconds, letting it avoid drops and spot obstacles that could get caught in its brush bar.

(Image credit: Future)

Moving and mapping


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