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Here's how first responders can get one free Pixel repair


A couple of days ago, we told you that Samsung had announced that it was offering free phone repairs to first responders on the frontline fighting the deadly battle against COVID-19 in the states. The manufacturer is teaming up with uBreakiFix to provide free screen repairs, battery replacements, and more to doctors, nurses, EMTs, police officers, firefighters, and others. The plan is called “Free Repairs for the Frontline,” runs through June 30th, and includes 30% off purchases made on the Samsung.com online store.

First responders with a Pixel get one free repair from uBreakiFix

Today, uBreakiFix announced that it has teamed up with Google and will also be offering free repairs to first responders who own a Pixel handset. First responders include people employed in law enforcement, police officers, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), firefighters, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and nursing home/hospital staff. By presenting their badges at one of the more than 500 participating uBreakiFix locations, these Pixel toting heroes receive one free repair of any Pixel model, regardless of the damage. The repair chain franchise listed some common problems that they fix such as “screen damage, charging port issues, battery replacements, camera issues, speaker issues, and even liquid damage in some cases.”

Each uBreakiFix franchisee has received a set of guidelines that are based on suggestions made by the CDC, state, and local agencies. As a result, local franchises are supposed to make sure that their employees are washing their hands more often, constantly clean work-environments and surfaces that are always being touched by employees and the public, and engage in “minimal person-to-person contact.” Employees are wearing gloves when touching devices and wearing masks when required to do so by law. The company is also sanitizing all devices being taken in and those being returned to customers.

To work around the social distancing rules that most Americans are trying to adhere to, uBreakiFix is offering contactless curbside service and is accepting devices that need repair through the mail. It also will make “house calls” under certain conditions. The company notes that “These changes allow uBreakiFix to continue providing critical tech support and repair as communities nationwide transitioned to working remotely, homeschooling, connecting virtually with friends and loved ones, entertaining themselves from home, and more.”

The free Pixel phone repairs for first responders will be available through June 30th or until supplies last. First responders taking advantage of this offer must drop off their Pixel inside the store, or use curbside service. Eddie Trujillo, uBreakiFix Vice President of Partnerships At uBreakiFix said, “We know that ‘together’ is the only way to get through this. We’re grateful to work with our friends at Google to honor those serving on the frontlines of this crisis. We know that a broken smartphone is more than just an inconvenience right now, and it’s our privilege to do what we can to help first responders and healthcare heroes stay connected to what matters most during this time.”

You can find the closest store by clicking on uBreakiFix.com. On the web page, you can schedule an appointment and view a list of available services. While Samsung and Google have deals worked out with the company, uBreakiFix will also repair (for a charge) iPhone models, and phones made by other manufacturers such as HTC, LG, Motorola, BlackBerry, Nokia, Amazon (the infamous Fire Phone), OnePlus and Sony.

We have read first-hand reports written by several first responders many of whom are risking their lives to save the lives of others. Doctors and nurses in the E.R. and the police are staring death right in the face, many times without the necessary PPE that they need. While they aren’t considered first responders, we also applaud those delivering packages (including the new phones and tablets being ordered) and the tireless workers keeping food markets open.



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