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Chrome Remote Desktop: 4 easy steps to get started


Once upon a time, in a world not so far away, accessing a computer remotely required all sorts of costly, complicated software and technical know-how.

These days, it’s a different story. Google’s free Chrome Remote Desktop service makes it dead-simple to get on any computer — Windows, Mac, Linux, or Chrome OS — from practically any other desktop or mobile device. You can access all of the remote system’s contents and even click around as if you were sitting right in front of it.

Chrome Remote Desktop can be useful for signing into your own personal or work computer from afar, and it can be equally valuable for peeking in on someone else’s system — be it your co-worker’s or your mother’s — to provide hands-on help without having to be in the same location.

And best of all? Getting the service up and running is easy as can be. In fact, all you need to do is decide what type of connection you want and then complete a couple quick steps, and you’ll be remotely connecting like nobody’s business.

(Note that Chrome Remote Desktop might not work with company-managed, enterprise-level Google accounts. In that scenario, it’s up to the IT department to decide.)

Using Chrome Remote Desktop to access your own computer

Step 1: Prepare the computer for connections

If you want to be able to access your own computer from another desktop or mobile device, start by opening up Chrome on the host computer (or downloading and installing Chrome, if you’re using a Windows, Mac, or Linux system that somehow doesn’t already have it). Within Chrome, navigate to Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop web app and click the circular blue arrow icon inside the box labeled “Set up remote access.” (If you see a blue button labeled “Turn On” instead of a blue arrow, congratulations: You’re one step ahead! Skip the next paragraph, and you’ll be back on track.)

Copyright © 2020 IDG Communications, Inc.

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