Header Ads

Breaking News

The 10 most powerful companies in networking


Network World’s top columnists tells what makes each of these 10 companies the biggest power players in IT.

AT&T: THE CARRIER COLOSSUS

By Frank Dzubeck, Industry Commentary

AT&T keeps getting bigger but still is managing to execute on all cylinders. It is earning accolades from financial analysts and seeing its stock price rise (buoyed by a potential 10% dividend increase and a $10 billion stock buyback).

During the last nine months, AT&T’s wireline business revenue exceeded $43 billion. The last nine months’ revenue for Cingular Wireless, which AT&T expects to own fully after it acquires BellSouth, exceeded $27 billion. Projecting revenue for this last calendar quarter at $16 billion for AT&T and $10 billion for Cingular results in a staggering $96 billion annual run-rate. Voice revenues (54.5%) still drive AT&T’s balance sheet, but data revenue (28.5%) is growing from quarter to quarter.

Look at these statistics for perspective on AT&T’s stature: Its global backbone network comprises more than 535,000 fiber route-miles handling 7.6 petabytes of data traffic per business day; it hosts 30 Internet data centers on four continents, five global network operations centers and 10 global customer-support centers; and it has almost 100,000 access points in 150 countries, as well as strategic relationships with 190 carriers.

Throughout its divestitures, mergers and acquisitions, AT&T never lost its corporate-customer focus. During 2006, AT&T expanded its security portfolio to more than 10 services and launched 24 services directed at corporations. Among the carriers, AT&T now has one of the broadest portfolios for corporate-customer services, with options for everything from application management to managed security. Particularly noteworthy for 2006 was the extension to 23 cities of its Opt-E-MAN virtual private LAN service, which has received Cisco QoS certification.

Source Link

No comments